A giant 60ft tall humanoid robot in Japan has moved for the first time based on the Japanese anime series Mobile Suit Gundam was filmed pointing, walking, and ‘taking the knee’ during a recent test. 

The Japanese Gundam robot weighs around 25 tonnes but has just proved to its legions of fans that it can move. The robot was built as part of a new attraction at Yamashita Pier by engineers at Gundam Factory in the Port of Yokohama. 

The huge machine is located in the port city of Yokohama. It was due to become the centerpiece of the factory on October 1, but the coronavirus pandemic delayed the opening until later this year, operators confirmed.

The factory is a new amusement park based on the fictional Gundam universe. The Gundam anime series has sparked a multi-billion dollar industry including movies, manga, plastic models, and video games.





COVID19 has delayed the public launch, which can walk, kneel, and point. The site’s operator said: “This decision was made to ensure the health and safety of our fans and employees in response to the worldwide spread of Covid-19.

“We apologize to all of our fans who were looking forward to our grand opening and ask for your understanding.

“In the meantime, we will be making preparations so that all of our visitors can enjoy themselves in safety.”

The Gundam robot has been in the works for around six years and has 24 moving parts. Engineers started work to ensure every single piece met strict weight requirements.





Fans were treated to a video of it taking the knee as workers watched on from an observation deck. Video shows the huge robot moving its right arm and fingers, lifting its legs, and kneeling. It also moved its arm and pointed its finger up to the sky.

Once completed the robot will have 24 degrees of freedom. Meaning it can properly walk despite being 25 tonnes and 60ft tall.

Head of design for the project, Jun Narita, told Popular Mechanics that special considerations about the types of material were needed – otherwise a single hand – 6.5ft long – could weigh as much as 1,300 pounds.

Once completed the robot will have 24 degrees of freedom – meaning it can properly walk despite being 25 tonnes and 60ft tall.





Head of design for the project, Jun Narita, told Popular Mechanics that special considerations about the types of material were needed – otherwise a single hand – 6.5ft long – could weigh as much as 1,300 pounds.

A statement on the project’s site said: ‘We have made the difficult decision to cancel the Special Experience preview event scheduled to begin this July and postpone our grand opening scheduled for October 2020. ‘We expect to have our grand opening within the year. Details will be announced as available,’ the statement continued.

The decision to delay the release of this new 60ft robot for general public enjoyment was ‘made to ensure the health and safety of our fans and employees in response to the worldwide spread of Covid-19,’ the organizers confirmed.

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