Switzerland Crash: Twenty Dead In WW2 Vintage Plane Crash - Insight Trending

Switzerland Crash: Twenty Dead In WW2 Vintage Plane Crash

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Twenty people have died after a World War Two vintage aircraft crashed into a mountainside in eastern Switzerland, police say.

The plane - a Junkers JU-52 HB-HOT - was carrying 17 travelers and three group on a touring flight when it took off on Saturday evening.

Administrator JU-Air said it was disheartened by the news and it had set up a helpline for relatives. It has suspended all flights until the point that further notice.

The reason for the crash isn't known.

The travelers were coming back to Zurich from a two-day journey in Locarno close to Switzerland's southern outskirt.

Despite the fact that there were observers to the crash, the BBC's Imogen Foulkes says that the examination concerning what happened will require some serious energy.

The plane had no black box, and the remote snow capped area of the crash implies there was little radar checking.
(image source : dawn)
"In light of the circumstance at the crash site we can state that the airplane crushed into ground vertically at moderately rapid," said Daniel Knecht of the Swiss Transportation Safety Investigation Board.

"What we can preclude now is that there had been an impact before the crash, neither with another air ship nor with some other snag, for example, a link."

A witness who was on the mountainside at the season of the crash told the 20 Minutes daily paper that "the plane turned 180 degrees toward the south and tumbled to the ground like a stone".

Of the 20 individuals on the flight, 11 were men and nine were ladies, police representative Anita Senti said at a news gathering.

Police say the travelers were matured somewhere in the range of 42 and 84 years of age and that the relatives of everything except one of the casualties had been reached.

The assemblages of the casualties, 17 from Switzerland and three from Austria - accepted to be an Austrian couple and their child - are as yet being recuperated.

The air ship smashed around 2,540m (8,333 ft) above ocean level, on the western side of a 3,000m pinnacle called Piz Segnas.

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